The Poverty of Theory
yesscotland:

There will be a referendum on an independent Scotland on the 18th of September. How do you intend to vote in response to the question: Should Scotland be an independent country?

Yes support climbs to campaign high : http://voteY.ES/2b

#indyref http://ift.tt/1y38Az1

yesscotland:

There will be a referendum on an independent Scotland on the 18th of September. How do you intend to vote in response to the question: Should Scotland be an independent country?

Yes support climbs to campaign high : http://voteY.ES/2b

#indyref http://ift.tt/1y38Az1

It is therefore, I think, a mistake to think of the individual as a sort of elementary nucleus, a primitive atom or some multiple, inert matter to which power is applied, or which is struck by a power that subordinates or destroys individuals. In actual fact, one of the first effects of power is that it allows bodies, gestures, discourses, and desires to be identified and constituted as something individual. The individual is not, in other words, power’s opposite number; the individual is one of power’s first effects. The individual is in fact a power-effect, and at the same time, and to the extent that he is a power-effect, the individual is a relay: power passes through the individuals it has constituted.
Foucault, Michel, Society Must be Defended, ed. Bertani and Fontana, trans. Macey (Picador: 2003) p.29-30 (via fuckyeahdialectics)

Chinese women & the resurgence of gender inequality. Laurie Taylor talks to Leta Hong Fincher, about ‘Leftover Women’, her study of the pressures facing Modern Chinese women who are often locked out of social equality, property rights, and legal protection from domestic abuse.

Also, ‘smokestack nostalgia’ - the meaning of post-industrial imagery. Tim Stangleman, Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent, questions the continuing desire to reflect back and find value in our industrial past.

The winner of Thinking Allowed’s first Ethnography award, in association with the British Sociological Association.

Laurie Taylor and a team of esteemed academics - Professor Beverley Skeggs, Professor Dick Hobbs, Professor Henrietta Moore and Dr Louise Westmarland - set themselves the task of finding the study that has made the most significant contribution to ethnography over the past year. In the past, ethnographic studies have cast light on hidden or misunderstood worlds, from the urban poor in 1930s Chicago to the mods and rockers in British seaside towns in the 1950s. This year they considered submissions of startling range, colour and diversity, in the process learning much about the struggles of the war wounded ‘amputees’ of Sierra Leone; the ties between mothers and daughters on a working class housing estate in South Wales; the hedonistic excess of young holidaymakers in Ibiza; and the dreams and desires of young women in hostess bars in Cambodia. After much passionate debate, finally the winner can be revealed.

Laurie Taylor presents a programme about the winning entry which, in the judges’ view, has made the most significant contribution to ethnography, the in-depth analysis of the everyday life of a culture or sub culture.

Economic power is first and foremost a power to keep economic necessity at arm’s length. This is why it universally asserts itself by the destruction of riches, conspicuous consumption, squandering, and every form of gratuitous luxury.
Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction, 1984 (via jaseoface)